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10. "Function"

10. "Function"
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Most of us know that attending a work function simply means going to an event hosted by or relating to your workplace.

But the way British people refer to social gatherings is a telltale sign of what class they are in.

Here’s how Kate Fox breaks it down: Lower-class people go to a “do.” Those in the middle class usually call it a “function.” Upper-class people just call it a party.

11. "Refreshments"

11. "Refreshments"
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“Refreshments” sounds like a refined word to most ears, something you’d see printed on an invitation to a fancy party or wedding.

However, Fox says that refreshments are only served at middle-class events.

The royal family and others in the upper class simply have “food and drink.”

12. "Dessert"

12. "Dessert"
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Despite the particularities in their vocabulary, the members of the British royal family are still human.

Like any humans, they occasionally like to indulge in something sweet after a meal.

But while elsewhere it might be called, they call it pudding (which includes all types of sweet treats, including actual pudding).

According to Fox, dessert is becoming slightly more acceptable to say, as younger people in the upper-middle class are influenced by other forms of non-British English.

However, asking if anyone “wants a sweet” after a meal “will get you immediately classified as ­middle-middle or below.”

However, here are 9 things that Queen Elizabeth II would NEVER eat.

13. "Mum and Dad"

13. "Mum and Dad"
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Ma, Pops, Mummy, Daddy – we all had different names for our parents growing up, but for the most part, they turned into “Mum and Dad” as we got older.

Not so for the royal family.

They call their parents Mummy and Daddy even as adults.

Isn’t it endearing to think of Prince Charles calling Queen Elizabeth Mummy?

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Source: RD.com

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