close
Advertisement

Five Shopping Hacks for Foods Low on the Glycaemic Index

Low-GL foods create a smaller, more sustained rise in blood glucose than high-GL foods, and don't require as much insulin.

Shopping Hacks for Foods Low on the Glycemic Index
iStock

What’s the difference between mashed potatoes and spaghetti? The potatoes tend to send blood sugar up high in a hurry, while the pasta causes less of a stir—even if you were to eat the same amount of total carbohydrate in both cases. Scientists have discovered that some types of carbs, once in the body, convert faster to glucose than others do.

Back in 1981 a nutrition scientist tested a host of foods (all containing 50 grams of carbohydrate) on people, measured the blood sugar reactions, and used them to rate the foods on a scale he called the glycemic index (GI). He discovered that certain starchy foods, such as potatoes and cornflakes, raised blood sugar nearly as much as pure glucose did! These earned high GI scores.

One thing the GI doesn’t take into account, though, is how much carbohydrate a serving of a food contains. You’d have to eat a heck of a lot of carrots to get 50 grams of carbs from them. The same goes for most vegetables and fruits. A better measure, then, is the glycemic load (GL), which corrects for this problem.

Advertisement
1. Why are low-GL foods more desirable than high-GL foods?
Why are low-GL foods more desirable than high-GL foods?
Flickr

High-GL foods cause blood glucose levels to rise sharply, prompting the pancreas to secrete insulin to bring it back down. Low-GL foods create a smaller, more sustained rise in blood glucose and don’t require as much insulin.

Studies have found that people who eat diets with a high GL have a higher rate of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. One study found that men who typically ate foods with a high GL had a 40 percent higher chance of developing diabetes. In the Nurses’ Healthy Study, women who ate diets with a high GL had a 37 percent higher chance of getting type 2 diabetes over the six-year span of the study. Yet another study found that swapping just one baked potato per week for a serving of brown rice could reduce a person’s odds of developing type 2 diabetes by up to 30 percent.

 

Of course, eating low-GL can also help if you already have diabetes. In one recent study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, researchers asked volunteers to eat 14 different typical meals (such as bagels and cream cheese with orange juice, for example), then measured the change in their blood glucose levels. They found that the GI of the foods in each meal was about 90 percent accurate in predicting how much the volunteers’ glucose levels changed.



Advertisement

More in Tips/Advice

7 annoying habits and the fascinating scientific reasons for them

7 annoying habits and the fascinating scientific reasons for them

Why does your co-worker constantly clear her throat? What’s behind your best friend’s Facebook oversharing? Science has the answers to these annoying habits.
Warning: these 16 everyday things pose huge health risks

Warning: these 16 everyday things pose huge health risks

Your cabinets are full of health products that can be hiding a dark secret: They pose a serious threat if you’re not careful.
17 cold sore remedies you didn’t know you could make at home

17 cold sore remedies you didn’t know you could make at home

Read on to learn how to quickly heal a cold sore and prevent future outbreaks from occurring.
10 pains you should never, ever ignore

10 pains you should never, ever ignore

Here are the pain symptoms that require immediate attention.
13 things you need to know about food poisoning

13 things you need to know about food poisoning

Food poisoning is highly unpleasant – and can even be downright dangerous. Here’s how you can avoid falling ill.

Advertisement