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You hold grudges

You hold grudges
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All that pent-up bitterness and frustration could deduct years from your life! “There is an enormous physical burden to being hurt and disappointed,” Karen Swartz, M.D., director of clinical and educational programs at the Johns Hopkins Mood Disorders Center said in a statement. In fact, one study found that people who only forgive when others apologise first or promise not to do the transgression again are more likely to die earlier than people who are less likely to forgive under such conditions. Plus, holding onto a grudge can also increase your blood pressure and heart rate and even lead to feelings of depression. In the words of Elsa from Disney’s Frozen, “let it go.” Your mind and body will thank you!

You love to barbecue

You love to barbecue
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Barbecues are a way of life in many Western societies, but the National Cancer Institute (NCI) says that grilled meats may increase your risk for cancer. Any meat cooked over an open flame at high temperatures exceeding 148 degrees or cooked for long periods of time is exposed to cancer-causing chemicals known as heterocyclic amines (HCAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Apparently, these compounds have been found to change your DNA, which may raise your cancer risk. The NCI recommends avoiding direct exposure of meat to an open flame, cooking meat in a microwave prior to grilling to reduce the exposure time, or continuously turning the meat over a high heat source to reduce HCA and PAH formation.

You always blast the volume on your headphones

You always blast the volume on your headphones
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If you take your headphones off and hear a ringing or buzzing in your ears, your music is too loud. Even if your hearing quickly returns to normal, you may be doing lasting damage to your ears, says M. Charles Liberman, PhD, director of the Eaton-Peabody Laboratories at Massachusetts Eye and Ear told TIME. Long or repeated exposure to sounds at or above 85 decibels can cause hearing loss, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). For example, an MP3 player at maximum volume can reach 105 decibels or noise from heavy city traffic is 85 decibels. The problem with noise-induced hearing loss is that it’s typically gradual and you may not notice it until it’s too late when it’s more pronounced. The NIDCD suggests avoiding noises that are too loud, too close, or last too long. Head here to find out more in our guide to avoiding hearing loss.

You don’t manage your stress well

You don’t manage your stress well
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Stress can make you sick – literally. A 2012 study suggests that work-related stress could ruin your DNA. Researchers found that Finnish people with the most job-related stress had the shortest telomeres, DNA sections that when shortened can cause cells to die or become damaged. “We know that the telomeres [wear down] over time, but possibly anxiety and stress may expedite that,” Vivian Diller, PhD, a psychologist in New York City told HuffPost. “That is the closest we’ve gotten to understanding the relationship between stress and how our body may age faster.” Stress can also suppress your immune system, ruin your sleep, increase your blood pressure, and make your brain feel all fuzzy, which essentially ages you both inside and out. That’s why it’s best to hit the gym, do yoga, or read a book to decompress and calm your mind from all the daily hustle and bustle. Head here to find out how to teach yourself to meditate and relieve stress.

You never say no to dessert

You never say no to dessert
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Your junk food habits may age your body quicker if you’re grabbing for that pint of ice cream every night. Sugar molecules love to latch onto proteins and fats, which turn into AGEs (advanced glycation end products) during the glycation process. These AGEs can damage collagen and elastin, the two proteins in your skin that make it smooth, taut, and plump. Researchers have even found that these diet-derived AGEs could contribute to vascular tightening, liver disease, and possibly Alzheimer’s. “For most people with normal levels of glucose, the glycation process is something that happens gradually over the course of a lifetime,” Greg Hillebrand, PhD, a biochemist at Proctor & Gamble told elle.com. “It’s really not a big deal, but diet and lifestyle choices can affect how quickly the effects can be seen on the skin.” Steer clear of white sugar, high-fructose corn syrup, and simple carbs, like pasta, to slow down the glycation process and maintain your youthful glow inside and out.

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Source: RD.com

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