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Here’s a compliment

Here’s a compliment
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“Compliment” and “complement” sound exactly the same – and, to make matters worse, their meanings aren’t super different. A “complement” is something that increases the value of, or goes well with, something else. A “compliment” is a kind, praising statement. Homophones like these can be tricky to keep straight. If you’re struggling to be certain which one to use, try these spelling rules on for size: A “complement” is something that “completes” something else. On the other hand, since I like getting compliments, make sure there’s an I in “compliment.”

Accommodate more letters

Accommodate more letters
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Here’s another one where the double letters trip people up, with good reason. If you get stuck on the word “accommodate,” just remember that it’s a long enough word to “accommodate” both a double C and a double M. Or think that the best “accommodations” at a hotel are the ones with two double beds, just like the word has two double letters.

Think of the months

Think of the months
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When you say “calendar” out loud, it sure doesn’t sound like that last vowel should be an A. If you find this word a little tricky, remember that it has two A’s in it, one for each month on the calendar that begins with A (April and August).

Need a mousetrap?

Need a mousetrap?
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“Separate,” the verb, sounds like it should have those two A’s in it. But when you use it as an adjective, you accent only the first syllable and pronounce the last two differently. Nevertheless, the spelling is the same, and you can remember that by reminding yourself that there’s a rat in separate.

Here are 70 more words (and phrases) you’re probably getting wrong. 

A teeny-tiny mistake

A teeny-tiny mistake
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The word “minuscule” means very, very small. So does the word “mini.” Then why, oh why are the first four letters of “minuscule” not M-I-N-I? Well, it’s because “minuscule” comes from “minute,” not “miniature.” So the next time you’re writing out “minuscule,” take a “minute” to remember the origin of the word.

Your own worst critic

Your own worst critic
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It can be tricky to remember that the third syllable of “criticise” starts with a C and not an S. Just think of the word’s close relatives, critic and critical.

Don’t miss these 30 little-known words that will help you win Scrabble. 

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The millennium trick

The millennium trick
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Here’s another word where the double letters can trip you up. Just like with “embarrassed” and “accommodate,” think double or nothing for “millennium.” If it helps you to remember each pair of letters individually, try these tricks. Think about how “millennium” starts just like “million,” with the double L (even though a millennium is a thousand, not a million, years). For the double N’s, think about how a millennium refers to years, just like the word “annual,” which also has two N’s.

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Source: RD.com

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