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13 words you will never, ever hear the royal family say

13 words you will never, ever hear the royal family say
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Some terms are considered too improper to be spoken by royalty. In her book Watching the English, social anthropologist Kate Fox explains which words are banned from the royal family’s vocabulary and the surprising reasons why.

1. "Tea"

1. "Tea"
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FYI, we’re talking about the meal, not the soothing, healthy drink.

In many parts of the United Kingdom, the evening meal that takes place between 5pm to 7pm is called tea.

However, this term is typically associated with the working class.

Members of upper social classes, including the royal family, call this meal dinner or supper.

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2. "Portion"

2. "Portion"
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The royals don’t watch their portion sizes to lose weight.

Instead, they watch their helping sizes, using another upper-class term.

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3. "Pardon"

3. "Pardon"
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If and when (we can be optimistic!) you get the honour of meeting anyone in the royal family, you’ll want to act on your most polite behaviour, excusing yourself when necessary.

But whatever you do, don’t say “pardon”.

We may think it’s formal, but apparently, it’s like a curse word to the royals.

Instead, say “sorry” or “sorry, what?”

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4. "Toilet"

4. "Toilet"
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Blame this word’s French origin for why it’s banned in royal circles.

If you’re looking for a restroom in Buckingham Palace, ask for the loo or the lavatory.

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5. "Patio"

5. "Patio"
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Some Brits have a patio in their backyards. The royal family, however, accents their landscaping with a terrace.

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6. "Lounge"

6. "Lounge"
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While some Brits use the phrase “living room” to describe the main front room, the more common term is lounge.

The royal family, on the other hand, uses neither. They refer to it as a drawing room or sitting room.

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7. "Couch"

7. "Couch"
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And what do members of the British upper class sit on when they relax in their sitting rooms?

It’s certainly not a settee or a couch, two words used by those in the middle class or lower.

Instead, the royal family would sit on a sofa.

8. "Perfume"

8. "Perfume"
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When your friend says she found the secret to making perfume last longer, stop her mid-sentence.

The royals don’t say “perfume,” remind her.

They say “scent”, as odd as that might sound.

Elsewhere, the only person we can imagine saying, “I love your scent” is an obsessed stalker… but maybe if we say it enough, we’ll get used to it. Maybe.

9. "Posh"

9. "Posh"
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Mark this as one of the British slang words you didn’t realise you knew.

Sadly, the royal family doesn’t use it – nor does the rest of upper-class society, even though their lifestyle is the epitome of the word.

They replace posh with smart.

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