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Do rabbits make good pets?

Do rabbits make good pets?
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Enter #bunnies on Instagram, and you’ll be one of the over three million people smitten with the too-cute-for-its-own-business animals. But does it make a good house pet? Unlike cats and dogs, who are considered predators, rabbits are prey. It’s not in the furry little creatures’ nature to enjoy being picked up because that’s how predators capture them. You have to take a more deliberate approach to earn a bunny’s trust, according to the House Rabbit Society. You can do this by getting down to its level and spending time with them out of its cage (rabbit proof the room first). Gently handle, pet, and interact with it softly, and you will have the cuddly snuggle bunny of your dreams.

Dutch

Dutch
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The Dutch Rabbit is one of the most popular and recognisable breeds. The Dutch rabbit’s popularity is likely due its gentle and friendly disposition.

Harlequin

Harlequin
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The Harlequin rabbit comes in two gorgeous varieties – the Japanese and Magpie. The Japanese rabbit is orange or fawn and either black, blue, chocolate, or lilac. The Magpie is white and either black, blue, chocolate, or lilac and both varieties are around four kilograms of stunning beauty. When it comes to showing the Harlequin at a rabbit show (yes, those exist), the colour split on the face must be clearly discernible or the rabbit will be disqualified. Precise markings or not, the Harlequin is a sweet and gentle breed, who is active and curious. In the world of rabbit mothers, it takes top honours alongside the Dutch rabbit, for its maternal nurturing.

Holland lop

Holland lop
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Originally from the Netherlands, the Holland Lops has down-facing ears, a compact body, and a large round snuggleable face. The hallmark features are quite possibly the reason it’s among the top five most popular breeds for pets. Its mini cuddle bunnies at just 7.5cms high and 1.8 kilograms. Hollands are calm, gentle, and thrive on attention from its humans. It’ll be content with plenty of space to roam and cat toys. Yes, Holland Lops like cat toys!

French lop

French lop
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Easygoing and relaxed in temperament, the French Lop thrives on interacting with its human caregivers. It loves to be picked up and petted – and at an average of 4.5 to 7 kilograms, you’ll tone your own biceps at the same time. The French Lop is hardly dainty with its massive, heavy-boned physique and broad sturdy head. But, hey, you gotta have a sturdy base to hold those thick and supple adorable ears that hang so low.

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Lionhead

Lionhead
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It’s a far stretch from lion to a rabbit, but this petite little breed sure is trying to come off as the king of the jungle with its distinctive mane. Yet, it has no desire to stalk and pounce, unless it’s for some bunny to love. Lionheads are super friendly and love to bond with people, whether it’s interactive playtime or being a lap bunny for some quiet time. It’s no wonder people are hopping to breeders to bring one home.

 

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Flemish giant

Flemish giant
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As breeds go, the Flemish Giant is well, a giant, it averages around six kilograms but it’s known to tip the scales at over nine kilograms. The docile personality of the Flemish Giant has earned it the nickname “Gentle Giant,” and some say the breed acts more like a dog than a rabbit. Flemish Giants are good listeners, too, with erect ears about 20.5cms long –big enough to hold all your secrets and soft enough to rub against your cheeks.

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American chinchilla

American chinchilla
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Stand aside other rabbits of note: Chinchillas can be credited with the development of more breeds and varieties of rabbits worldwide than any other domestic breed. This salt-n-pepper hunka-bun is the rarest of all the Chinchilla breeds. But don’t confuse it with another small pet – the Chinchilla, who is actually a delightfully cute rodent. These bunnies are gentle and love for its soft, rollback coat to be petted. Easy to care for and hardy, it’s around five kilograms.

Himalayan

Himalayan
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The Himalayan has a few uncommon traits not seen in other rabbit breeds. First, it’s shaped more like a cat than a rabbit. The other trait this bunny pulls from its hat is the ability to change colours. Most Himalayans are born with white fur, but depending on the climate or even changes in seasonal climates, its colour can vary. A white rabbit living in a cold climate turns black, for example. Himalayans also do something known as head weaving, which it does to focus its sight.

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Netherland dwarf

Netherland dwarf
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The sweet and delicate little bun-bun is the smallest breed of domesticated rabbits, weighing in at just over one kilogram. Its popularity has surged in recent years, with 25 new colour varieties. And who can pass up that face? Its adorable short round head and chubby cheeks, paired with those little-bitty perky ears, make these honeybunnies hard to resist. And this breed is wound up like the Energizer bunny, with loads of energy, playfulness, and charm.

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